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Acceptance Testing

Acceptance testing is a test conducted to determine if the requirements of a specification or contract are met. It involves evaluating whether a software system, product, or application meets the desired acceptance criteria defined by the stakeholders or customers. Acceptance testing can include various types such as user acceptance testing (UAT), business acceptance testing (BAT), contract acceptance testing (CAT), regulations/compliance acceptance testing (RAT), operational acceptance testing (OAT), and more.

The purpose of acceptance testing is to ensure that the system functions as intended and meets the user's needs, as well as to identify any potential issues or discrepancies before the system is deployed into production. It is typically the final stage of testing before the system or software is ready for release.

During acceptance testing, real-world scenarios are created, and the software is tested to verify that it behaves correctly and provides the intended functionality. This type of testing may involve functional testing, usability testing, performance testing, and any other relevant tests to validate that the system meets the specified requirements and performs as expected.

Acceptance testing can be conducted manually or through automated scripts, depending on the nature of the system being tested and the available resources. The focus is on determining whether the system satisfies the predefined acceptance criteria and meets the user's expectations.

Overall, acceptance testing plays a crucial role in ensuring the quality and reliability of software systems, helping to verify that they align with the intended requirements and are ready for production use.

Example: Adding alt text to images for screen readers, using proper heading tags for structured content, and providing keyboard navigation options are all accessibility measures.

Go to blue arrow
back to glossary

Acceptance Testing

Acceptance testing is a test conducted to determine if the requirements of a specification or contract are met. It involves evaluating whether a software system, product, or application meets the desired acceptance criteria defined by the stakeholders or customers. Acceptance testing can include various types such as user acceptance testing (UAT), business acceptance testing (BAT), contract acceptance testing (CAT), regulations/compliance acceptance testing (RAT), operational acceptance testing (OAT), and more.

The purpose of acceptance testing is to ensure that the system functions as intended and meets the user's needs, as well as to identify any potential issues or discrepancies before the system is deployed into production. It is typically the final stage of testing before the system or software is ready for release.

During acceptance testing, real-world scenarios are created, and the software is tested to verify that it behaves correctly and provides the intended functionality. This type of testing may involve functional testing, usability testing, performance testing, and any other relevant tests to validate that the system meets the specified requirements and performs as expected.

Acceptance testing can be conducted manually or through automated scripts, depending on the nature of the system being tested and the available resources. The focus is on determining whether the system satisfies the predefined acceptance criteria and meets the user's expectations.

Overall, acceptance testing plays a crucial role in ensuring the quality and reliability of software systems, helping to verify that they align with the intended requirements and are ready for production use.

Example: Adding alt text to images for screen readers, using proper heading tags for structured content, and providing keyboard navigation options are all accessibility measures.

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